How to: Make Comics Without Drawing

We're all familiar with the "typical" comic format — a drawing of a scene or people, with added captions and/or speech bubbles.

But there are other ways to make a comic.

Minimal Illustrations

First of all, don't overestimate how much drawing is required to illustrate your comic.

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"Movie Critic"
Grrlpup, July 2008
"The Obligation of Having a Red Marker"
Sanguinity, March 2008

Also, don't forget stick figures!

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"Runner's High"
Grrlpup, May 2008
"Two On The Second"
Sanguinity, July 2008

No Illustrations

Who says a comic needs illustrations?

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Untitled
Ashley, July 2008
(click here to view this comic larger)
"0900"
Grrlpup, Hourly Comic Day 2008
"seventeen-thirty"
Sanguinity, Hourly Comic Day 2008

Photocomics

Got a digital camera? Make photocomics.

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"June3on3rd_03"
EvanNichols, June 2008
"June3on3rd_01"
EvanNichols, June 2008

Public Art, Found Art, Clip Art

You don't have to use original-to-you artwork. Make a collage, either digitally or with scissors and paste.

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"July3on3rd_03"
EvanNichols, July 2008.

There are plenty of images that you can legally use in your comics: public domain images, licensed images (if you abide by the terms of the license), and fair use of copyrighted images. See Using Found Images for more information on each of these, as well as potential sources.

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